Fartashphoto's Blog

Wikileaks Julian Assange’s accusers should not be anonymity

Posted in Uncategorized by fartashphoto on January 8, 2011

Iranian activists end their protest in Geneva

Posted in Uncategorized by fartashphoto on December 23, 2010

Shirin Ebadi and the group of Iranian women activists who started a sit-in outside the offices of the United Nations in Geneva on December 20 to protest against the continued incarceration of their peer, Nasrin Sotoudeh, ended their sit-in today.

Nasrin Sotoudeh, the Iranian lawyer who has been jailed in Iran since September on charges of “propaganda against the regime and collaboration with the Human Rights Defenders Centre”, ended her hunger strike yesterday at the behest of her family and numerous political figures who were deeply concerned for her well-being.

As Sotoudeh languished in jail after almost three weeks of hunger strike while the Iranian judiciary remained unresponsive to her demands for a just trial, Shirin Ebadi along with Mahboubeh Abbasgholizadeh, Shadi Sadr, Parvin Ardalan, Mansureh Shojaee, Khadijeh Moghaddam and Asieh Amini, seven prominent Iranian women’s rights activists began a sit-in in front of UN offices in Geneva to focus attention on Sotoudeh’s plight.

Tthese activists issued a statement on Wednesday maintaining that they had organized their sit-in “to enable the voice of Nasrin Sotoudeh to speak to the world” and also to enlist the assistance of the UN Human Rights Council to save their imprisoned colleague.

“Unfortunately our protests have not been successful;” the statement goes on to add. “Nasrin and other political prisoners are still incarcerated under inhumane conditions. During the three-day sit-in many civil and human rights’ activists declared their support for the sit-in. As a result, the protest against harsh conditions of Nasrin has evolved into a general demand for investigating unfair convictions of all political prisoners in Iran.” They point out that in the mean time two more women’s rights activists, Bahareh Hedayat and Mehdieh Golrou, sentenced to long imprisonment terms, have started a hunger strike to protest against their dire situation in prison.

They list the numerous other imprisoned dissidents such as Mohammad Nourizad, Ebrahim Yazdi, Mohammad Oliaeifar and Moansor Osanlo who are suffering from fragile health in Iranian prisons while the judiciary refuses to provide them with adequate health care.

They refer to the plight of student activists, such as Ahmad Zeydabadi and Abdollah Momeni, as well as journalists such as Bahman Ahmadi Amoi, Massoud Bastani and Nazanin Khosravani imprisoned for long prison terms or held in legal limbo.

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Stephen Harper brings US style media control to Canada

Posted in Uncategorized by fartashphoto on December 18, 2010

Brave Hero’s Exposing Corrupt U.S. Government Julian Assange and WikiLeaks

Posted in Uncategorized by fartashphoto on December 5, 2010

Julian Assange and WikiLeaks are Brave Hero’s Exposing U.S. Corrupt Government

Heaviest sentences ever ruled against Bloggers

Posted in Uncategorized by fartashphoto on December 3, 2010

Iranian blogger, Hossein Ronaqi Maleki’s 15-year prison term has been approved by an Islamic Republic appellate court.

RAHANA website that covers human rights news in Iran reports that Ronaqi has been kept in solitary confinement for over 11 months and was given 15 years in prison by a preliminary court.

The blogger known as “Babak Khoramdin” is charged with “membership in Iran Proxy, an internet group, propaganda against the regime, insulting the leader and the president.”

Hossein Ronaqi Maleki went on a hunger strike in September in protest to his sentence and the behavior of the judiciary officials in prison.

According to Reporters Without Borders this is the heaviest sentence to date for a blogger save the 19-and-a-half-year sentence given to another blogger, Hossein Derakhshan.

Reporters Without Borders announced that the Islamic Republic regards bloggers, like journalists, as its enemies and has been issuing heavier sentences for them.

Twitter is hope for the future

Posted in Uncategorized by fartashphoto on September 7, 2010

Journalists are obsessed with Twitter. Obsessed. They use it, talk about it, analyze it, deconstruct it, reconstruct it, love it, hate it, capitalize on it, become experts on it, monetize it, argue about it, and become micro-famous on it.

Twitter is popular not just because it allows journalists to crowd source with thousands of people or because it’s a fun way of amassing followers and inflating egos. It also gives reporters a chance to create a new system of reporting. In the past, journalists were confined to their words and research methods, all dictated by traditional routines. Now they can create new strategies, use different tools, brand themselves differently, and propose new ideas. Twitter has given them hope and direction to do this because it has given them a public forum in which to loudly speak their ideas.

Twitter is hope for the future. It is promise of change.

Shirley Brady is agreeing that Twitter serves a role as a mediator between reporter and reader. “No matter what your specialty is, these days you are forced into the public arena. You have to really engage with your readers and you can’t just publish your story and move on to the next one. You have to keep the conversation going…which can be a pain when you’re done and on to a new assignment.”

Indeed, it’s a great time for journalists — mostly because the Internet can now help them find credible sources of information. In the days of early AOL chat rooms, the public saw the Internet as a strange, “Lord of the Flies”-type society, where anonymous creeps could not be trusted. Now, not only has the Internet become a place where people can trust each other, but professionals are actually learning to take it seriously. Twitter has proven to be a credible source for breaking news, real time, and it can help build a future where the reader and the reporter can trust each other again.

Folks were tweeting 5,000 times a day in 2007. By 2008, that number was 300,000, and by 2009 it had grown to 2.5 million per day. Tweets grew 1,400% last year to 35 million per day. Today, we are seeing 55 million tweets per day—that’s an average of 600 tweets per second!

The worst Human Rights abuser

Posted in Uncategorized by fartashphoto on August 9, 2010

The United States government’s Sudan Peace Act of 21 October 2002 accused Sudan of genocide in the Second Sudanese Civil War (1983–2005) which has cost more than 2 million lives and has displaced more than 4 million people. It is estimated that as many as 200,000 people had been taken into slavery during the Second Sudanese Civil War. The slaves are mostly Dinka people.

Slavery in Sudan has been documented since ancient Egypt. While the government of the Republic of Sudan denies the allegations of slavery in the country, claiming that these reports are attempts to shed a bad light on Muslims and Arabs.

The US State Department’s human rights report issued in March 2007 claims that “All parties to the conflagration committed serious abuses, including widespread killing of civilians, rape as a tool of war, systematic torture, robbery and recruitment of child soldiers.”

Both government forces and militias allied with the government are known to attack not only civilians in Darfur, but also humanitarian workers. Sympathizers of rebel groups are arbitrarily detained, as are foreign journalists, human rights defenders, student activists, and displaced people in and around Khartoum, some of whom face torture. The rebel groups have also been accused in a report issued by the American government of attacking humanitarian workers and of killing innocent civilians.

Khamenei has called human rights a fundamental principle underlying Islamic teachings, which precedes western concern for human rights by many centuries. Human Rights in Islam include the rights to live, to be free, and to benefit from justice and welfare.

In response to Western complaints of human rights abuses in Iran he has stated that the American administration has committed many crimes and is therefore not fit to judge the Islamic Republic. He is fond of serious abuses, including widespread killing of civilians, rape as a tool of war, systematic torture, robbery and recruitment of child soldiers. He’s the worst Human Rights abuser in our world today.

The Stoning of Soraya M. – Official Trailer [HD]

Posted in Uncategorized by fartashphoto on July 10, 2010

A drama set in 1986 Iran and centered on a man, Sahebjam, whose car breaks down in a remote village and enters into a conversation with Zahra, who relays to him the story about her niece, Soraya, whose arranged marriage to an abusive tyrant had a tragic ending.

Iranians flee human rights abuses

Posted in Uncategorized by fartashphoto on May 31, 2010

 Iran’s human rights record has been criticised in a new report by Amnesty International.

It highlights what it describes as exceptionally high levels of violence, used in the aftermath of June’s disputed presidential election.

It says that human rights violations are as bad as at any time in the past 20 years,